The Darwin Exception

because it's not always survival of the fittest – sometimes the idiots get through

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Orlando Dick and the Spiteful Bitch

Posted by thedarwinexception on June 1, 2011

Today was a much less explosive day than yesterday – but really, how many days could really match yesterday’s raw emotion? Lee Anthony took the stand, and parsed Every. Single. Word. As if the slightest mis-step could land him in a jail cell next to his sister. I don’t know if he was acting on orders from Cindy to “watch what he said”, if he was really nervous, if he had legitimately forgotten most of the events of the last three years, or if he was just afraid that no matter what question he was answering, someone was eventually going to ask if he ever molested his sister. But his testimony was painful – and not in the same way his mother’s testimony was painful – this was a more boring “Oh for God’s Sake JUST SAY IT…” kind of painful. If it comes down to a choice of watching this crapfest or watching him mouth “I love you’s” to his sister, yeah, I’ll take creepy incestLee any day.

But first we have motions, which is kind of a daily occurrence. Today’s motion is brought to you by Huggins vs. State. The State is withdrawing it’s previous objection, because they now acknowledge that the defense did not offer the testimony regarding Caylee’s father as a true fact, but only to illustrate another of Casey’s imaginary friends. And it’s kind of funny to hear these distinguished attorneys arguing at the podium the demise of Eric Baker, and whether or not he is Caylee’s father, and how no one can really know, since, you know, this particular imaginary friend is, unfortunately, deceased. Surreal. But it does make you wonder what exactly the protocol is when one’s imaginary friend dies. Do you mourn? Do you arrange a funeral? Do you bury the imaginary friend in a matchbox? See, I would make sure that all my imaginary friends were also relatives. When relatives die, you can get paid time off from work. Of course, I guess this is moot if the imaginary friend also works with you at your imaginary job.

But, anyway, to clarify what they ere arguing: The State had made a motion that since the defense was offering Casey’s statements that Caylee’s father was Eric Baker, that the state could then impeach her credibility and the truth of her statements by entering her criminal record into the record, saying, in effect “You can’t believe this woman on ANYTHING she might say – she’s a FELON – SIX TIMES!!!” The defense was arguing back, saying “You fools! We KNOW she’s a liar! That’s what we are saying – WE are entering statements that she’s made in order to PROVE she’s a liar!” In most cases, this isn’t an issue – with normal hearsay rules and regular evidentary procedure, these rules are there to protect the defendant, in order to keep out damaging evidence that might call into question their credibility. And the defense attorneys would ensure that NOTHING the defendant has ever said that might “open the door” to impeaching their credibility is ever brought in. In THIS case, though, the defense is entering all kinds of things to impeach the defendant’s credibility, kind of turning hearsay rules on their head.

When we get back to testimony, we have Amy Huizanga back on the stand for cross examination. Baez hammers home the point that she and Casey were only friends for 5 months, and theirs was mostly a text messaging friendship. Baez also points out that out of the 50,000 pages of text messages the police recovered from Amy’s phone (Amy explains she had a job with a lot of down time…), only one of those messages was from Casey complaining that she couldn’t go out because her mother couldn’t take care of Caylee. And only one of those messages referenced the horrible smell in Casey’s car.

Baez also points out that since Amy and Casey were only friends for a short period of time, she can’t really attest to the relationship between Casey and Cindy. Amy counters that she testified to exactly what she was told. Baez counters again with the “yeah, but you had limited knowledge” and Amy says “I testified as to what I was told…”

Baez also asks if Amy’s memory was a little foggy during that period, as a result of her heavy drinking and drunk driving that resulted in an accident. Amy argues that her accident isn’t relevant – that she legitimately fell asleep. She testifies that she has fallen asleep in broad daylight on that same long stretch of road “many times”, prompting every resident of Florida to check where the fuck she was when she had this accident and rerouting their commutes. Good God. Between this chick and the apparent mass handing out of Driver’s Licenses to people who can’t even speak English well enough to understand the word “caretaker”, I am currently on my knees thanking God I don’t live there any more.

Baez asks Amy if she had a concussion because of that accident, and she says she doesn’t know – that she doesn’t think she hit her head, but she was not sure if she did or not. Baez shows her a text message she sent saying that she hit a guardrail and thanking God she didn’t get a D – at this point, the state objected, and she never did finish the statement, but it was clear from the portion she did say exactly what she was thanking God for. Baez does manage to get out that she “self totaled” her car – as Amy puts it.

Baez also points out that Amy sent a text message to all of her friends asking them to call her in 10 minutes if they hadn’t heard from her – just in case she passed out- because she didn’t know whether or not she hit her head. She says that no one actually called her – but one wonders if she passed out and just didn’t know if anyone called her…..

Now that Baez has painted her as a drunk, he also wants to paint her as a ho. He asks her if she moved in with Ricardo – Casey’s ex boyfriend, and if she later dated Casey’s ex-fiancee Jesse Grund. Amy says that yes, she moved in with Jesse, and yes, she “went out with” Jesse – as friends. And Baez asks her if there are any other ex-boyfriends of Casey’s she either moved in with or dated. HaHa! Good one, Jose.

Baez then asks if she was at Casey’s home on June16th, she says no.

When she goes to get off the stand, she turns to the judge and asks him if she can say something. Yeah, right, like that will happen. The attorneys go to sidebar, and Amy goes with them. Yesterday she was handed a subpoena by the defense as she left the stand. I think this is why she wanted to “say something”. Apparently she was not very happy with the subpoena from the day before, as she now lives out of the country. She leaves the sidebar looking pleased – so perhaps the state quashed the subpoena for her.

Lee Anthony is up next. He testifies that he doesn’t see Casey regularly since he left his parents home, but he does speak to her once in a while. During the 31 days of Caylee’s disappearance, he spoke to Casey one time through MySpace. He spoke to his mother on the 3rd of July. At this time he became aware that Casey and Caylee had not been at his parents home in quite a few weeks. Lee investigated through MtSpace and Facebook to see where his sister might be. He noticed some postings on Faeebook that suggested she might be downtown at a nightclub called the Dragon Room that night. Lee took his friend Danny and went downtown to see if he could find Casey. Mallory, his girlfriend at the time, then met Danny and Lee at the club.

Lee says that once it became clear that Casey wasn’t going to show up at the club, he texted her and asked her if she wanted to get a drink with him. Casey never responded. After several more text messages with no response, he told Mallory to text Casey and not tell Casey that Lee was with her. There were no responses to this message, either. Le then tried calling Casey, leaving messages. Casey picked up the phone once or twice, and Lee asked her where she was at and if she wanted to meet up. Casey first told him she was busy and with friends, doing her own thing. Lee eventually had a conversation with Casey and asked where she was and Casey responded that she was in Jacksonville. Lee says he knew that was a lie – so he followed up with more questions about where she was in Jacksonville and what she was doing there. Lee says he told her he knew she was lying. Casey maintained that she was, indeed, in Jacksonville. Lee also asked where Caylee was and Casey told him Caylee was with a babysitter. Lee told Casey she needed to talk to their mother, and Casey eventually hung up on him.

Lee says that he and his party stayed in the area of Church Street, thinking that if Casey was in one of the bars in the area, he would eventually see her. He never did. He didn’t attempt to find Casey again, since his mother told him to just back off – Lee believed that his mother had the situation under control.

Lee says the next time he saw Casey was on the 15th of July. He says his father called him and asked him to go to the house. No one was at home when he first got there. When he entered the garage, he saw his old car, the Pontiac Sunfire., and he saw writing on the windshield of the car and the car was emitting a potent odor. Lee says that he was in the house less than five minutes when his mother and sister came home. (With some refreshing of the memory) he recalls that the first thing his sister said when she came in the house was “You’re not listening to me, why do I even bother….” Lee says that both his mother and sister were combative at this point. Casey went to her bedroom and Lee followed her.

Lee says that his mother and sister continued to argue about where Caylee was, Casey kept saying that Caylee was with the nanny. Lee says that before this time, he didn’t even know Casey had a nanny. Casey kept saying that Caylee was already asleep and shouldn’t be disturbed. Casey said that she didn’t want to disrupt her routine. Lee says that his sister and mother were arguing back and forth for quite a while. His mother would come in and out of the room, arguing each time. Casey said that they could get Caylee “tomorrow”. Lee offered to go and get Caylee himself, or his roommate at the time go get Caylee. In his mind, there was no excuse not to just go get Caylee.

Lee says that he specifically remembers asking Casey why she wasn’t allowing anyone to see Caylee, and Casey replied “Maybe I’m just a spiteful Bitch.”

While his mother was out of Casey’s room, Lee continued to try and reason with Casey. He even “role played” with her, illustrating to her what was going to happen if the police came and questioned her about Caylee’s whereabouts. He tried to impart to her that once the police were involved, they were going to get Caylee back, so she might as well tell them now where she was, appease their mother, and avoid the inevitable. Lee says that Casey told him that numerous times their mother had thrown it in Casey’s face that she was an unfit mother. Casey said in response to that “Maybe I am.” Casey said that their mother had also called Caylee a mistake – a great mistake, and the best mistake Casey had ever made – but a mistake.

Lee says that at this point he was getting very frustrated, because none of this was making sense to him. He couldn’t understand why they couldn’t just go and get Caylee to appease their mother.

Lee says that finally Casey tells him, when they are alone in her room, that Caylee had been kidnapped, that Casey did not know where she was, that the nanny had taken her. Lee says his mother immediately came into the room screaming and yelling, saying to Casey “What did you do?” and “We could have found her!”Lee continued to talk to Casey while their mother called the police. He asked Casey where she last saw Caylee and Casey said at the “Sawgrass apartments”. Lee asked where Casey had been staying and she told him with Tony Lazzaro at his apartment. Casey told Lee that she had been trying to find Caylee herself – camping out in front of the apartment where she dropped Caylee off for days at a a time. Casey also said she would go to places that Caylee could be or where someone might take her – stores and parks, etc. Casey said that one time she got a phone call where the only person on the phone was Caylee and that Casey told Caylee to go and get an adult to put on the phone. Lee says that after he learned all this he immediately went into “search mode”. He got Tony’s name and address from Casey and called Tony and made arrangements to go get Casey’s things to see if there was any clues in that stuff. He went to Tony’s and got Casey’s (broken) laptop, a duffel bag of clothes and a backpack,
and another bag containing nick nacks.

Lee identifies an envelope containing ticket stubs, photocopies of notes, receipts and keys. There are 19 receipts. This stuff was all found in Casey’s belongings from Tony’s apartment. The belongings were all turned over to the police. Lee says none of the items taken from Tony’s apartment belonged to Caylee.

Lee testifies that when the first police officer arrived, the officer went to Casey’s bedroom and started questioning her. George arrived shortly after this officer. After the policeman arrived, Lee and Casey had a conversation in the garage. The car was still in the garage and still stank. Lee questioned Casey further, asking about Tony, and made reference to the car and how awful it smelled.

The defense then crosses the witness, with Dorothy Clay Sims doing the questioning. This is the first time Sims has crossed a witness in the case. She doesn’t really do a very effective job, getting nothing out of Lee that the jury hasn’t heard before – although she does get him to say that the writing on the car wasn’t “a message”, but was put there by the tow yard. I don’t even know why she asked this question – did she think that if she hadn’t the jurors would have thought that this was some secret code that everyone had overlooked. Good God. I do like her voice, though. It’s the kind of voice I wish I had – breathy and sexy. She could probably have a second career as a phone sex operator.

Sims also has Lee tell the jury that his father had an extra set of keys to the car – which would allow him to access the vehicle and the trunk. And Lee also saw Casey crying. George didn’t go into Casey’s room when he arrived back at the house. George didn’t ask Lee what was going on, either. Of course, since we heard Cindy on the 911 call telling him Caylee was missing, I think it’s safe to assume she filled him in.

Lee agrees that in the family he was the peacemaker. Sims also has some kind of goofy theory that Cindy was more concerned about the family than Caylee because she said “We could have found her…” when she found out Caylee had been gone 31 days without notice by Casey. Sims also asks about some goofy shit about how Lee and Casey stuff their shit in bags when they pack rather than fold their clothes, so someone else must have packed the duffel bag that Lee picked up from Tony’s house. I have no idea why it matters as to who packed the bag. It’s not like they found Heroin in it or something. Or maybe she’s going to argue that George snuck over to Tony’s and folded the clothes to make Casey look more guilty. He probably broke the laptop, too. The Bastard.

On re-direct Lee says that once he learned of Caylee’s supposed kidnapping, his focus left his sister and was placed on finding Caylee. Lee also says that once the police learned that Caylee was missing, their focus left Casey and was placed on finding Caylee. (And we know how much this must have pissed of Casey, right?)

Lee is excused, subject to recall.

Next up is the first of the detectives, as the state’s time line has now moved past the 911 calls and into the actual police investigation of the case.

The first officer on the scene is the next witness, Mr. Rendan Fletcher. He was hired by the Sheriff’s office in 1999. On July 15th he responded to Cindy Anthony’s car in a marked car in full uniform. He arrived solo. He thought that he was responding to a stolen vehicle call, coupled with a verbal altercation between the complainant and their adult daughter.

When he arrived there were three adults inside the home – George, Cindy and Casey. He didn’t see Casey when he first arrived – she was in another room. George was quiet – Cindy was quite upset – Officer Fletcher was trying to gather the initial information. He asked Cindy why she called and what was going on with the car. After a short time he spoke with Casey. Casey didn’t say much and wasn’t very forthcoming with any information. The officer was asking questions but wasn’t getting any responses from Casey that addressed his questions or her mother’s concerns. She finally told the officer that her daughter had been missing for about a month, that the daughter had been left with her nanny and she had not been able to locate her since. Casey told the officer that she had been conducting her own investigation up to this time. The Officer says that it wasn’t made clear why she hadn’t called the police and asked for assistance.

Other officers soon arrived to assist, after Officer Fletcher called his supervisor, Sgt. Reginald Hosey, to update him on the situation. Deputy Acevedo was one of the officers sent to assist. Later, Sgt, Hosey also arrived on the scene. Once Hosey arrived, this became his investigation.

Fletcher says that he asked Casey about the exact location of the nanny, who Casey had named as Zenaida Fernandez Gonzales. Casey told him she didn’t know the exact address by name but she was willing and able to show the officers where this was. Fletcher drove his marked vehicle to the SawGrass apartments, with Acevedo following in her marked car with Casey.

When they arrived, Acevedo had Casey point out the exact apartment where she had last left her child. Casey pointed out apartment 210. Fletcher went to the apartment and says that from what he could see the apartment was vacant. There was no furniture in the apartment.

On Cross, Baez focuses on the car and whether or not it smelled. Fletcher says he didn’t smell anything from the car, but he wasn’t focusing on the car. He didn’t go up to it, just passed it as he was going into the side door. Fletcher testifies that it says nothing in his report about a smelly car. Fletcher also says that none of the four officers who were there told him that there was a smell of human decomposition coming from the car.

After lunch, Baez inquires of the court about the videos that the state is entering into evidence. He wants portions of these videos redacted. When he inquired of the state about what portions of the videos they were seeking to introduce (earlier that day…) the state informed him that they intended to use all of them. The state told him to type out what portions of the videos he found objectionable, and they could litigate the matter. But it was the state’s understanding that there was a time and place to object, and it had long passed. Baez was not happy with this answer. Baez feels that the defense can object to evidence at any time – up to and including when it is introduced at trial.

The judge asks if the defense had access to these videos in a timely manner. Baez says they have. Perry says that they have had numerous hearings and meetings on motions regarding evidence, and that there was a deadline for any motions regarding non scientific evidence. This deadline was back in December of 2010. Baez says that he has limited resources, numerous issues, and he has had to prioritize issues. He says he is doing the best he can. Baez says that he thinks that he has brought this up in a timely manner – the state won’t be introducing this evidence for *days* yet. The judge says that the pretrial order specifically allowed for a deadline for motions dealing with non scientific evidence that required no testimony. That deadline was December 2010. If Baez failed to file a motion to suppress this evidence, then he has waived that right, unless there is something he didn’t know at that time. Baez can make short objections, such as relevancy, but the problem with doing it at this date is that there is no time to redact the portions he is objecting to. The judge counts five attorneys at the defense table who have had ample time to make these motions. The judge offers to take a brief look at the issue, but the judge says he may have waived his rights to suppress unless there is specific information he didn’t know about before.

The next witness is called – Officer Adriana Acevedo. She is employed with the Orange County Sheriff’s office – she has been there 5 years. In 2008 she was a road patrol officer. She responded to the Anthony’s after Officer Fletcher had arrived. She arrived at 9:52 pm. She made contact with Officer Fletcher and asked for specifics as to what was going on inside the residence. She then took written statements from George, Cindy, Lee and Casey. Sgt Hosey arrived shortly after she did. Hosey asked Acevedo to escort Casey Anthony to the SawGarass apartments. Casey was not under arrest at this time, nor was she handcuffed. Acevedo asked Casey if she would be willing to go with her to the SawGrass apartments and Casey said she was. It was Acevedo’s understanding that she was taking Casey to the SawGrass apartments to identify the last known place she had dropped off her daughter. It is police policy that anytime they transport someone who is not under arrest to keep verbal communication with the person, asking if they are fine, asking if they are comfortable and telling them that anytime they would like to they are able to leave the vehicle. At no point did Casey say that she wanted to go home or to get out of the vehicle.

Acevedo transported Casey to the SawGrass apartments. Casey advised which apartment it was to the officers, and Acevedo asked her if she was certain. Casey said she was. Acevedo then transported her back to the Anthony residence.

Baez crosses the witness. Acevedo says that when she initially arrived at the Anthony’s residence, George and Casey were quiet, and Cindy was upset. Acevedo was at the Anthony’s almost 2 hours before she transported Casey to the SawGrass apartments. She says she smelled a “garbage type” odor in the garage, but couldn’t say if it was specifically emanating from the car or somewhere else. Acevedo says she doesn’t have a lot of experience with “death smells”.

Amanda Macklin is then called to the stand She was the manager of the SawGrass apartments in July of 2008. She says that Apartment 210 was vacant on July 15th, 2008, and was mainly used as a model. She testifies that no one by the name of Zenaida Fernandez Gonzalez was ever a tenant at the Saw Grass apartments – in apartment 210 or any other apartment. She says she never saw Casey or Caylee at the SawGrass apartments.

Lt. Reginald Hosey is the state’s next witness. He was a sergeant when he was called to the Anthony’s home by Officer Fletcher. When he arrived he took over the scene, and directed his officers as to what to do. He directed Fletcher and Acevedo to take Casey to the SawGrass apartments, and directed other officers to retrieve Casey’s cell phone from Tony Lazzaro’s. He directed Acevedo to take written statements. After Acevedo obtained a written statement from Casey, Hosey had a conversation himself with Casey. He walked and talked with her briefly, to reassure her that he and his deputies were not there to take Caylee from her, they just needed the location of the child to ensure that she was OK. Hosey says that this conversation was in response to prior conversations he had had wherein Casey had said that this was all because her mother wanted to take the baby from her, or keep the child, and that Casey and her parents weren’t getting along. Hosey, who was the ranking authority figure on the scene, wanted to get Casey away from the hustle and bustle for a moment just to reassure her that no one there wanted to take her child from her. Casey was verbalizing that this was a domestic disturbance, not a kidnapping, and was constantly saying that her mother just wanted to take the child from her.

After they had no success locating the child, Hosey followed procedure and contacted Detective Yuri Melich,

Cross of the witness by Cheney Mason, who gives Hosey a hard time about wearing a suit to court instead of a uniform. Hosey says he just wanted to look nice. Masons asks if all the responding officers to the Anthony’s home were in uniform. Hosey says they were.

Hosey says that he does not recall seeing Casey in handcuffs at all that night, although he said he did remember it in his earlier deposition. And he doesn’t remember directing anyone to take handcuffs off of her.

Hosey says he smelled a foul odor coming from the garage. He doesn’t know if the smell came from the car, but the car trunk was open, as was the garage door, when he arrived. He says he didn’t investigate the odor or inspect the trunk, write any reports, and no, he didn’t call the CSI as a result of the smell.

Hosey says he doesn’t remember anyone Mirandizing Casey that night, she was never under arrest and Hosey says that at any time she could have asked Officer Acevedo to let her out of the patrol car, and Acevedo would have complied. But Casey could not have opened the door by herself from the inside.

Hosey admits that when Casey returned from the SawGrass apartments, she was led into the house and was questioned by at least three deputies until Melich arrived, about 2 hours later. Hosey says that not all these deputies were in the house at all times, some were walking around inside and outside the house. Hosey says that he can’t say that he wouldn’t have let any of the residents leave. Hosey says that once he left the scene that night, he had nothing more to do with this case besides wrangling protestors who later picketed and demonstrated at the Anthony’s home.

Redirect – Hosey says that on that night, Casey advised him that her child was alive and well. Casey also advised him that the child was with a babysitter that she could not contact at that moment. Casey also advised him that she did not want her mother to have contact with the child that evening.

Hosey says that the people n the house were there only to provide information about the investigation at that time. Hosey would not have stopped Lee, for example from leaving and returning. Hosey says that no one asked to leave that evening, and none of the deputies told anyone that they were unable to leave.

On re-cross, Hosey says that George was calm that evening, although he voiced some of the same concerns that Cindy did. Cindy was not calm at all. She was tearful and angry and upset – and at times she calmed down. Casey had a flat affect the entire evening.

The next witness is Detective Yuri Melich. He has been with Orange County for 10 years. He now works for Internal Affairs. He was a Detective Corporal in the Missing Persons and Child Abuse Unit in 2008.

He was called to respond at the Anthony residence on July 16th, and he arrived just before 4 am. He met with Casey Anthony at that time. She had previously given a written statement to the initial responding officers. Melich then reads this statement to the jury.

“On Monday, June 9th 2008, between 9 am and 1 pm, I, Casey Anthony, took my daughter, Caylee Marie Anthony, to her nanny’s apartment. Caylee will be three years old on August 9th, 2008. She was born on August 9th, 2005. Caylee is about three feet tall, a white female, with shoulder length light brown hair. She has dark hazel eyes (brown/green), and a small birthmark on her left shoulder. On the day of her disappearance Caylee was wearing a pink shirt with jean shorts, white sneakers and her hair was pulled back in a ponytail. On Monday June 9th, 2008, between 9 am and 1 pm, I took Caylee to the SawGrass Apartments located on Conway Road. Caylee’s nanny, Zenaida Fernandez Gonzalez, has watched Caylee for the past year and a half to 2 years. Zenaida is 25 years old and is from New York. She is roughly five foot seven inches tall, 140 pounds. She has dark brown curly hair and brown eyes. Zenaida’s birthday is in September. I met Zenaida through a mutual friend, Jeffrey Michael Hopkins. She has watched his son Zachary Hopkins for 6 months to a year. I met Zenaida in 2004 around Christmas. On the date listed above, June 9th, 2008, after dropping Caylee off at Zenaida’s apartment, I proceeded to head to my place of employment, Universal Studios Orlando I have worked at Universal for over 4 years, since June of 2004. I left work at around 5 pm and went back to the apartment to pick up my daughter. However, after reaching the apartment, I realized that neither Zenaida, Caylee or either of her two roommates were home. I have briefly met Raquel Ferrell and Jennifer Rosa on various occasions. After calling Zenaida to see where she and Caylee were, and when they were coming home, I waited outside of the apartment. I had called Zenaida earlier that morning prior to bringing Caylee over for the afternoon. When I called her that afternoon her phone was no longer in service. Two hours passed, and around 7 pm, I left the apartment and headed to familiar places that Zeinaida would go with Caylee. One of Caylee’s favorite places is J Blanchard Park. I spent the rest of that evening pacing and worrying one of the few places that I felt “at home” Anthony Lazzaro’s apartment. For the past four weeks since Caylee’s disappearance, I have stayed at Anthony’s apartment at Sutton Place. I have spent every day since Monday, June 9th, 2008 looking for my daughter. I have lied and stolen from my friends and family to do whatever I could, by any means, to find my daughter. I’ve avoided calling the police, or even notifying my own family out of fear. I have been and still am afraid of what had or may happen to Caylee. I have not had any contact with Zenaida since Thursday June 12th 2008. I received a quick call from Zenaida. Not once have I been able to ask her for my daughter or gain any information on where i can find her. Every day I have gone to malls, parks any place I could remember Zenaida taking Caylee. I have gone out and tried to find any information about Caylee or Zenaida whether by going to a popular bar or restaurant. I have contacted Jeff Hopkins on several occasions to see if he had heard from or seen Zenaida. Jeff currently lives in Jacksonville, Florida. On Tuesday July 15th around 12:00 pm I received a a phone call from my daughter Caylee. Today was the first day I have heard her voice in over four weeks. I am afraid at what Caylee is going through. After 31 days I know that the only thing that matters is getting my daughter back. With many and all attempts to contact Zenaida, and within the one short conversation on June 12th 2008, I was never able to check on the status or well being of my daughter. Zenaida never made an attempt to explain why Caylee is no longer in Orlando or if she is ever going to bring her home.

(OK – who wants to take the time to count up the number of lies in that statement??Anyone??)

Melich says he reviewed this statement with Casey in a spare bedroom of the Anthony home. He then spoke with Casey further on tape.

Transcript of Casey’s Interview with Yuri Melich

After taping this statement, Melich says he immediately headed out with Casey to check on all the places that Casey had told him about during the conversation. He went to 301 N Hillside and asked if she could point out the windows that belonged to Zenaida’s apartment. He later learned that Casey’s friends Amy and Ricardo used to live on Glenwood Ave, which was directly across from 301 N Hillside, the apartment she said Zenaida had lived in. Casey did not mention this fact.

Melich said they went from there to the SawGrass apartments. Melich asked her to direct him to apartment 210. Neither of them got out of the car at that point.

Almost across from the SawGrass Apartments there are some town homes, Casey claimed that this was one of the places that Zenaida had lived, and she wasn’t sure which apartment it was specifically, but it was one of the apartments in a certain area.

Melich then got out of the car, and knocked on several doors, and he told Casey that if anyone looked familiar to her to let him know. She saw no one that looked familiar.

Once this process was completed Melich drove Casey home. Melich told Casey that he would continue to look for Caylee and investigate the leads he had.

On Cross, Baez asks one question to lead – If Melich had ever gone by any other names, specifically “Dick Tracy Orlando”. This sets off an hour long sidebar and hearing.

The defense wants to introduce this “handle” of Yuri Melich’s that Melich had used on a website to comment on posts relating to the case. Apparently Melich broke his leg, had some downtime, and found a site he posted in. There is a lengthy sidebar, then a hearing, the result of which was that Judge says none of the postings can be introduced into evidence because the comments Melich posted had nothing directly to do with the case and showed no bias or discrimination towards Casey or the case.

The defense says that one comment in particular, one in which Melich likens a missing child case to “a murder without a body” does show bias and discrimination – but the judge doesn’t agree. Judge Perry says that if Baez can find some other comment that he believes shows bias, they can re-visit the issue, but for now, it stays out. Baez continues with his cross of the witness – and he can’t call him Dick Tracy Orlando. Which is a shame.

Melich says he arrived at the scene at 4 am, was briefed by Hosey and says that at that point he thought he was looking at a missing persons case, and a theft. He says he knew that Casey had already been to the SawGrass apartments with Acevedo, and that she had made a written statement. Melich doesn’t recall if the garage door was open when he arrived. He doesn’t recall seeing the Sunfire. At some point that evening, someone said there was an odor from the car, but he didn’t inspect the car. And he didn’t secure the car or call CSI.

Melich says that when he first arrived at the scene, Casey wasn’t a suspect of anything – she was the mother of a missing child. Melich did not know that Casey had been handcuffed before his arrival. He did not Mirandize her because he was not a suspect. Baez counters that she was also the mother of a missing child who was giving the police information that did not pan out. Melich says that yes, this was true, but that this misinformation was based on what other people were telling him – he hadn’t yet talked to Casey himself, so he suspected her of nothing.

Baez asks Melich if he believed that the information Casey had given in her written statement was “suspect” and Melich says that yes, he did, and that he wrote that he thought it was suspect in his written report.

Baez then says – so if you think her statement is suspect, you’ve got a kid that’s been missing for 31 days, you have a mother who is giving you suspect information and taking you to places that aren’t panning out – but you don’t think she’s a suspect? And Melich says no, not at that time.

Baez then asks about Melich’s statement, and asks about the “quotes” used within. Baez seems to think that “quotes” are only used for emphasis, and not as citations or used as if to say “so -called”. Baez must have slept through the “how quotation marks can be used” lesson in English class. Idiot. What a stupid line of questioning. Who the hell uses quotation marks for emphasis? Baez thinks that because Melich said “She said she felt QUOTE safe UNQUOTE that this must mean he wanted to draw attention to it. Not that Melich was using it as “CASEY SAID SO I’M QUOTING THIS AND USING QUOTES.” Fuck me. Baez is aggravating me.

Baez then goes through Casey’s statement with Melich. Baez points out that Casey told Melich that Casey had met Zenaida 4 years ago, and was introduced to Zenaida by Jeffrey Michael Hopkins. But she had no way to reach Hopkins, had no information about that. Melich says that she gave his previous employer as Universal, so she did give him some information about Hopkins.

Baez then asks Melich about the conflicting information Casey gave about Juliette Lewis, how in one place she says Lewis is her co-worker, but then says she hasn’t worked t Universal in months, that she told Lewis about Caylee being missing, but then says Lewis moved to NY two months ago, before Caylee was even missing. Baez asks Melich if he realized that he was dealing with something a little bit unique. Melich says he was meeting with a mother whose child was missing, and trying to gather information. Baez points out that the two outcry witnesses Casey gave to him both had no contact information, and she gave conflicting information about both of them.

Baez asks Melich about his questioning of Casey if she was on any drugs – Melich says that this is standard information gathering process. Baez then asks Melich if he asked Casey if she had ever committed suicide. Melich says that no, he wouldn’t have asked her that, because if she had ever committed suicide she wouldn’t be there. Baez says “Oh, no thoughts of suicide.”

Melich says that he asked Cindy and George about Casey a little bit. Melich says he got no information about Casey’s medical information other than her use of drugs.

The detective is excused, subject to recall.

The judge then discusses some housekeeping issues. The state says they are half way done with their case.

And you can call me Dick Tracy New York. God that’s awesome.

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2 Responses to “Orlando Dick and the Spiteful Bitch”

  1. Kim Rock said

    Great blog as usual, Kim. How are you watching the trial? I’ve been watching the live stream on CNN because the talking heads on True TV and HLN drive me nuts and so much is missed with the commercial breaks. Here, in California, the CNN stream starts and 6:00 a.m. and ends somewhere around 2:00. I’ve been trying to schedule my stuff around it but sometimes it just doesn’t work out. Is TV the only way to tape it (DVR) and watch it later?

  2. anygirl said

    Great job Kim, no that would be great job Dick Tracy New York. Love the fact you can make us laugh during this sad story each day!

    So, the blogging detective is flawed, oh well….most humans are! Anything Yuri might do could never make me dislike him as much as I do Bia$ed. He reaches further down to the bottom of the clown car each day.

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