The Darwin Exception

because it's not always survival of the fittest – sometimes the idiots get through

  • Recent Posts

  • Stuff I Blog About

  • Visitors

    • 970,062 People Stopped By
  • Awards & Honors

    Yesh, Right! I don't HAVE any "Awards & Honors" - so nominate me for something - I want one of those badge things to put here. I don't care what it is - make up your own award and give it to me. I'm not picky.

The History of Malone: How Dry I am

Posted by thedarwinexception on March 28, 2007

With the advent of prohibition, the Malone area became a part of the “far flung bottle line” to stem the flow of illegal liquor from Canada, and rum running became an unwelcome but ordinary part of North Country life.

A complete history of the region’s part in the “dry era” would contain some rather stirring, blood soaked stories, including about everything in the rum toting category from bootlegging and hijacking to running gun fights through the streets of the peaceful village.

Malone became occupied by a colorful garrison of prohibition enforcement officers and, in the flush years, the community was accustomed to seeing long fleets of seized booze cars brought in almost daily. And this region will long remember certain death rides on the Poke-o-Moonshine Road, the Lost Nation Road, the Mary Reilly Road and other obscure highways stretching up into the Adirondacks from the quiet reaches of the St. Lawrence River.

Most of the local Northern bootleggers were tools of big city organizations and the names of Legs Diamond, Dutch Schultz and other beer barons of the time crept often into enforcement procedures here.

Liquor traffic through the area tapered off in the last years, when prohibition became more openly flouted downstate by illegal still operators and bootlegging became a lesser evil hereabouts when John Barleycorn finally staggered forth from hi grave. But the long and unsuccessful warfare to keep him properly interred left many colorful but unpleasant recollections in Malone, including the story of the bootleggers who always dodged rabbits on the rum trail, no matter how hard pressed, but steered head on into Enforcement Officers.

The prohibition years also changed the face of the town architecturally. Among new buildings erected amid the tumult of the rum runners were the new Franklin Academy, the court house, the new Wead Library and the post office, which joined the fabulous Flanagan Hotel, which had been erected in 1914.

Main Street as it stands today was slowly emerging.

Advertisements

2 Responses to “The History of Malone: How Dry I am”

  1. […] The History of Malone: How Dry I am With the advent of prohibition, the Malone area became a part of the “far flung bottle line” to stem the flow of illegal liquor from Canada, and rum running became an unwelcome but ordinary part of North Country life. (tags: Campfire Malone) […]

  2. Veronique said

    Hey, you’ve hit the big time! Congrats!

    V.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: